About

My name is Christine, and I live in Japan. For a long time I have been interested in Finnish paganism, but never found many sources out there in English. I lived in Finland from 2009-2011 and while there, my knowledge about the practice increased greatly through personal experiences and meeting other Finnish pagans. Now I have created this blog in hopes that I can help other English-speakers gain some more wisdom about this religion.

If you have any questions or comments, or if you feel that something I have written is not correct (though you’ll have to back up your claim), then here is my e-mail: Mana_sama55 at hotmail dot com

I’d also like to point out that this blog is not affiliated with any right-wing anti-immigration group. I’m just a woman writing about the religion of my ancestors. There are no political leanings here. Thank you, that is all.

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24 Responses to “About”

  1. Nik

    Sepä jännä! I’ve been studying Finnish off and on for many years now and hope to live in Finland myself within a year or two. It’s true, finding any information outside Finland is very difficult. Have you met with the folks of Taivaannaula? I met them last summer for Karhunjuhla.

    A request: If you could set up RSS for your blog it would be very helpful. Kiitti!

    Nik

  2. Christine

    You must be quite good at the language then! I’ve gone to a couple informal meetings for Taivaannaula, but none of the nation-wide gatherings(well I was supposed to go to kekri, but got sick).

    I’m kind of new to this kind of blogging system, so I’m not sure if I did this right, but I put a link to the feed for this blog at the bottom of the main page. Let me know if I did something wrong with that.

  3. Nik

    Mä tulen toimeen. 🙂 People say Finnish is a horribly difficult language, but really the difficult thing is having nobody to speak with regularly. That, and the Finnish you learn from books is not the language as it is spoken – by the younger folks, at least! I’ve been working more at reading but immersion is really what it takes.

    If I manage a trip to Finland this summer we’ll have to meet up! (BTW I’m a friend of Päivi’s on facebook if you want to connect there, too).

    Thanks for setting up the RSS, too!

  4. Christine

    Indeed there’s so few people outside of Finland that can speak it, though I used to use it through MSN chat and that helped a bit. I’m learning in a classroom setting, but as you said, we don’t learn the spoken style. In any case, I’ve picked up on a bit by just living here. Hopefully you’ll be able to come here and learn by immersion someday soon! It’s so difficult for non-EU citizens to get a residence permit(what a pain that was).

    Ahh so she referred you to this blog, that was nice of her. I’m always up for meeting other pagans!

    Jee, I’m glad I did it right!

  5. conduitofjoy

    It is exciting to find your blog! I’m also a shamanic practitioner in Canada, and my grandmother was Finnish.

    I can’t wait to learn more about Finnish shamanism from your blog. I have relatives in Finland that have visited me in Canada, and I’d love to visit Finland.

    I just started my own blog not long ago, where I do shamanic journeys for other, amongst other things. It’s exciting how the internet can connect people with such specific interests!

    Hope to keep reading your blog,

    Kara
    http://www.conduitofjoy.com

    • Christine

      I hope I will not disappoint then! Most of my experiences are of a shamanic nature, but I try to give sources on here too since not everyone believes in that stuff. I have heard of a lot of Finns being in Canada, that’s nice that your relatives visited you! I’ve visited mine here, but they have not been to America yet. I know it’s quite expensive to go. I’ll take a look at your site!

  6. Addy

    Indeed there’s so few people outside of Finland that can speak it, though I used to use it through MSN chat and that helped a bit. I’m learning in a classroom setting, but as you said, we don’t learn the spoken style. In any case, I’ve picked up on a bit by just living here. Hopefully you’ll be able to come here and learn by immersion someday soon! It’s so difficult for non-EU citizens to get a residence permit(what a pain that was).
    +1

  7. Erik

    Terve,

    I’ve been reading your blog almost religiously. Mainly because there’s not a whole lot of info out there on suomenusko. But it’s also good to read about things from someone who is experiencing it, opposed to the strictly informational articles I read.

    There’s one thing that’s been bothering me. I’ve been trying to teach myself the language because it felt like the right thing to do. I get very discouraged when I find out that what I’m learning is not how they would speak. Then I start thinking about the fact that it’s nearly impossible for me to move there. What do I do with all of this when I feel so connected to my Finnish heritage and the old Finnish beliefs?

    • Erik

      To add:
      I want to move there. I think I would feel more connected and whole. But the language and moving issues seem like rocks in a path which are buried too deep to move.

    • Nik Gervae

      Nearly all books on Finnish cover only the standard/formal lanauge. It’s a shame there aren’t more books on truly colloquial Finnish, but I only ever saw one when I was in Helsinki.

      The fact is there are too many individual dialects, so one would have to choose, and then you would only be able to understand those people. Most people in Finland can understand all the dialects, of course, having grown up with them.

      Short of spending lots of time there, or getting a very good pen-pal, we have to content ourselves with being able to use standard Finnish, which everybody does at least know, even if it isn’t what they use casually. Me, I just wish I could read newspaper articles after 20+ years of study. What comes first with most foreign languages seems to come last with Finnish….

      • Christine

        Do you remember the name of that book on colloquial Finnish that you found? I’d so love to learn the Savo dialect.

      • Nik Gervae

        Unfortunately no, but it was at the big bookstore in Helsinki near Stockmann. Actually I think that bookstore was part of Stockmann…you could go through the basement into the main department store. The staff there should be able to find it for you.

    • Christine

      Indeed it is a big problem, even the courses I’m taking here are not of much help, and I really don’t want to sound like a textbook when I speak. The books we use are Hyvin Menee and Suomi Sujuvaksi, but there’s only a tiny mention in them of how what you learn in the chapters would be said in spoken style. Pretty much the best way is to find someone that speaks Finnish(and has a great deal of patience) to practice conversation with them. If only they had a Finnish Rosetta Stone series, that would be perfect since that program focuses on speaking more than anything else.

      It is very difficult to move here, but I found a way, so perhaps you can too.

    • Christine

      I did a little search and came across this: http://finnish-podcast.blogspot.com/. It appears that it teaches Finnish spoken style.

  8. Victoria Hogan

    Dear Christine,

    My great grandmother new the healing arts, was a visionary, walked and talked with the spirits and more. My grandfather held gifts as well. My mother was exceptional at reading a person’s future and she also walked and talked with the spirits. However, my mother was terrified that those of her family who held gifts, would be taken away and labele crazy. I and others in the family were born with gifts. My uncle and I talked of how the old ones are gone and with them the knowledge of all they knew. I also have Native American ancestry and have learned so much from the Medicine people. I have seen so many similarities between the Finnish and Native people, culture, beliefs and healing arts. I decided to begin a search to find more on my Finnish ancestry and came across your site. Thank you for sharing so much.

  9. Alan Salmi

    I am Finnish (2nd generation immigrant) from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. My home town has Finlandia University, Kaleva Cafe, my relatives live in Toivola, right next to Tapiola about 30 miles away! Not many know that there is a Finnish language television show every week in the U.P. called Finland Calling (Suomi Kutsu). I am delighted to find a Finnish Pagan blog! (by the way, you can see the shows on the net at: http://www.uppermichiganssource.com/entertainment/content.aspx?id=52720, just click on “watch finland calling”!

  10. Chris johnson

    Thanks for your blog which I enjoy.

    Sad to encounter people feeling for their roots and reassuring to feel your honesty.

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    this is an awesome blog, thanx for all the info!

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